Tag Archives: Adhesive bonding

  • Home exhibiting Tesla solar roof. Image by Tesla.

    Last month, Elon Musk announced the availability of Tesla’s new solar roof. These solar roofs are made to masquerade as tasteful, modern shingles; their attractive panels offer roofs from sleek modern to French slate. The solar panels are hidden in a pane of glass which contains a hydrographic coloring–a process that uses water to apply printed designs– to provide texture.

    But, these shingles must not only look good, like all solar panels, they must be tough enough to withstand elemental threats.

    Wind, rain, snow, sun, extreme temperatures–these are all stresses to any structure, especially solar panels. Because solar panels serve as an energy source, there is no room for failure in the field. The bonds that keep them together such as bonds between dissimilar materials, bonds on low energy polymers, coatings, laminates, and seals, must withstand the stresses as well. That’s why solar panel manufacturers turn to the Surface Analyst.

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  • How Clean is Clean Enough?

    by Emily Walsh May 2017

    Manufacturers often encounter a similar puzzle, when cleaning invisible contaminants from a surface, how do you know when the surface is clean; how clean is clean enough? This is a common question that manufacturers ask when preparing their surfaces for bonding, coating, sealing, printing or painting. Until now, there hasn’t been an objective and reliable way to answer this question. Successfully cleaning a surface directly correlates to the adhesive ability of the surface. In order to get something to stick reliably the surface must be clean. How we define that parameter is different for a variety of materials.

    For example, you clean your car differently than you clean your dishes. Why? Because a car rides on the road through rain, smog, dirt, maybe mud, and the other is a vehicle for your food.

    At BTG Labs, our answer to the “clean enough” question is, “Depends on what you’re doing.” There are dozens of critical surface preparation processes that exist for a number of different applications. A handful include:

    • Flame treatment on polypropylene bumpers prior to painting
    • Plasma treatment on PET catheters prior to coating
    • Hand sanding and solvent wiping on aircraft nut plates before adhesively bonding to composite
    • Grit-blasting titanium golf clubs in preparation of bonding to composite
    • Corona treatment on film for packaging prior to metallization, lamination, or coating

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  • Progress in the Reliability of Bonded Composite Structures

     

    Improving Composite Bonds in Aircraft

     

    The Surface Analyst™ technology has many of its roots in the CAI (Composites Affordability Initiative) program from the mid to late 1990’s.  This industry/government partnership comprised of a team charged with addressing the perceived risks and barriers to a more widespread use of composite materials in aircraft design. The collaboration included members from the Air Force Materials Laboratory, the Office of Naval Research, Bell Helicopter Textron, The Boeing Company, Lockheed Martin Corporation, and Northrop Grumman Corporation.

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  • Sandpaper, solvent, and composite.

    Introduction

     

    Solvent wiping and sanding procedures can greatly affect the surface energy of a substrate. To investigate the surface energy differences following different preparation procedures of an epoxy composite laminate, researchers created several different surface conditions utilizing different cleaning techniques. For this experiment, a BTG Labs Surface Analyst™ obtained measurements.

    The Surface Analyst is a fast, easy, accurate and nondestructive instrument that measures the contact angle of water  applied to the surface in a precise, controlled manner. This contact angle is determined by how strongly the surface energy of the substrate and the liquid deposited interact. The relationship between this contact angle and surface energy is complex, but well understood. More importantly, this relationship correlates with the adhesive strength of a paint, coating, print or adhesive to the substrate.

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  • Dr. Dillingham will be teaching two short courses at The Annual Meeting of The Adhesion Society.

    The Adhesion Science & Technology Short Course will be held February 19-20, 2016 at the Westin Riverwalk in San Antonio, TX.

     

    Adhesion and Surface Processes

     

    Dr. Giles Dillingham, President and Chief Scientist of BTG Labs, will be teaching two short courses at the annual meeting of the Adhesion Society in San Antonio, TX on Friday and Saturday, February 19 and 20, 2016.

    The courses, titled “Surface Energetics and Adhesion” and “Surface Modification and Surface Analysis,” are comprehensive introductions to the science and technology of adhesive bonding, adhesive chemistry and formulation, and design of adhesively bonded structures. …Read More

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